Playing Hyper Sentinel (Windows)

Time for some current generation, retro-themed shooting action; I’ve mentioned it in passing previously, but Hyper Sentinel is a bi-directional scrolling shoot ’em up for the current generation of consoles and Windows boxes – the latter being my platform of choice via Steam – where the player’s craft must destroy all of the ground installations on a space-faring Dreadnought before defeating its guardian and finally getting to watch the huge craft boil away into space. And if that sounds more than a little familiar, publishers Huey Games are basically a reincarnation of Hewson Consultants who, amongst many decent games and a couple of rather iffy conversions back in the day, published Uridium.

But when I sat down with Hyper Sentinel after buying it on launch day something felt… well, off. Most of the reviews I’ve read had described it as a “spiritual sequel” to Graftgold’s classic but it only took a few swings at the thing to realise that wasn’t really the case; Uridium‘s Manta has a huge amount of flexibility to the controls so players can constantly tweak their speed with touches of the joystick, but the Hyper Sentinel lacks that level of finesse and moving the controls horizontally just causes the craft to put its foot down in that direction if it wasn’t already doing so. The only option to tweak the speed is holding down the boost button to go faster for those times when the enemies or power-ups would be too quick to keep up with otherwise, but that faster speed also disables the main gun so must be used sparingly.

For the first week of on/off playing I really wasn’t enjoying it at all but, whilst writing that last paragraph earlier this week, something clicked; I stopped trying to play it like I would Uridium, properly got my head around how to use the boost and Hyper Sentinel suddenly felt more fun to play. Leaving a wake of destruction was enjoyable – even more so with the beefier power-ups – and some of the bosses became easier since I could chase them down. There aren’t background collisions to worry about unless players stray out of default difficulty territory and, rather than dying immediately, the ship gets ten shields which act as lives and can either be recharged with one of the items or just by hiding to avoid collisions for a while until they regenerate.

Personally, I can take or leave the neo-retro visuals these days in part because there are so many games going for a similar look that it’s hard to get excited any more; the pounding but not particularly memorable soundtracks are similarly reasonable and I think my less than sensitive ear is picking up some early Rob Hubbard drums in there too. But the gameplay is the most important part and that feels pretty solid and I’ve gone back to it a quite a bit over the last week. Granted, if I felt the need for a full fat Uridium-style experience with beefed up graphics and power-ups then the excellent Uridium 2 on the Amiga is the option I’d go for, but I do feel that Hyper Sentinel on its own terms is still a solid, playable blaster and I’ll no doubt return to it, either for the main game or to play the survival mode some more.

2 thoughts on “Playing Hyper Sentinel (Windows)

  1. Been watching your video and I’ve gone blind. My ageing eyes can’t keep up with these types of games any more. Just waaayyy too much going on…

  2. It’s different when you’re playing the game though, the majority of my focus seems to be on the craft and it’s immediate surroundings – that’s force of habit from playing bullet hell – and that’s easier to manage.

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