Playing X-Dazedly-Ray (Mega Drive)

1990 was a superb year for Mega Drive owning shoot ’em up fans and is pretty much when I personally jumped aboard that particular bandwagon with an imported Japanese unit. Games like Sagaia, Thunderforce 3 and Whip Rush were released for example, all being highly playable and demonstrating just how good Sega’s hardware was for this genre whilst hinting at what was yet to come. Sadly, X-Dazedly-Ray from UNIPACC really doesn’t fall into that camp and, when thinking back, there was for the longest time a small part of me which wondered why I handed over £24.99 for it back in the day.

The first games in the Gradius and Darius series seem to have been an inspiration for XDR‘s developers both from a gameplay standpoint and the visuals – the shield is very Darius-like with the options being more similar to Gradius except they can soak up bullets – although it’s nowhere near the standard of either Konami or Taito’s game. It does suffer badly from “Gradius syndrome” as well so, while it takes the entire first level to get some decent firepower together from the icons left behind by blasting certain enemies, everything is lost on dying and recovering from that situation with the now painfully underpowered ship ranks somewhere between frustratingly difficult and simply impossible.

XDR isn’t exactly a popular game, there’s a scathing GameFAQs user review which pretty much rips it to shreds and I’ve previously seen it described it as one of the worst Mega Drive games ever released during forum discussions. That’s being rather harsh on something that is essentially just mediocre though, and it’s not even the worst shoot ’em up for the platform either with titles like Curse, Xenon 2: Megablast or Divine Sealing being more aesthetically distinctive but, to my mind at least, less enjoyable to play.

So it’s not a great game by any stretch of the imagination, but still offers some entertainment; if the cost of cartridge publishing hadn’t meant there couldn’t be a home computer style budget range for Mega Drive games that’s where X-Dazedly-Ray would have fit in perfectly, not quite keeping up with the full-pricers for spectacle but still reasonably solid. For those wanting to give it a blast, go into the start menu to enable auto firing – because trying to constantly hammer two buttons for the main guns and missiles at a decent rate is something of an ask – and perhaps dial the difficulty down to “easy” before starting.

Workprint – May 2018

Yes, I’m a little late with the workprint this month but in my defence there have been things going on; I spent a significant chunk of the weekend in an unexpectedly large van with my stepson Matthew and stepson-in-law Josh, heading to Kent for an overnight stay in order to relocate boxes of old computers and software which have been sat in my dad’s garage for… oh, about sixteen years. Here’s what it looked like after we put everything into the van…

…and no, the large Rupert having a lie down on top of everything wasn’t originally mine but has been adopted anyway. I’ve found myself left with a lot to process – both in the literal sense and emotionally, the latter probably being the harder to deal with – but it’s done and everything is in one place now, although I haven’t had a chance to do any serious ferreting around just yet. I did get a family photo before we left for home by the way, so it wasn’t just pictures of storage boxes!

In programming news there hasn’t been much time of late (or more accurately, the problems I’m having with my shoulder means that sitting in front of a computer for extended periods is at best uncomfortable) but the previously mentioned C64CD project is pretty much done with just little extra polish and some “how it works” style articles required before release – there’s an all-formats retro game development competition I like the look of which might serve as a place to put it out, although I’ll need to check their rules properly beforehand since it’s using some wired graphics – and I’ve been doodling a little here and there when spare moments present themselves.

Playing Kikstart (C16)

Shaun Southern’s Kikstart on the C64 was one of the first high quality budget games I remember seeing at the time and that made quite an impression. It was based on the BBC television show Kick Start where motocross riders took on an assault course against the clock and the game shamelessly borrows many of the show’s more memorable features including the theme tune Be My Boogie Woogie Baby by Mr Walkie-Talkie. And anybody who knows the series or the game probably has that tune stuck in their head even if they didn’t click through to the video.

But that isn’t the game I want to waffle about today because, whilst there’s a straight port to the Atari 8-bit and an “enhanced” version for the C128 which added more levels, the C16 game which bears the Kikstart name is very different from the others. Yes, there’s a dirt bike and a scrolling course with hazards to manoeuvre over, but Kikstart on the C16 is more of an arcade style game than the slower, more methodical action of the C64 release it shares a name with. And that’s not a bad thing at all because it’s loads of fun to play with each stage being quite short but packed with obstacles including huge potholes, buses and trees to leap over.

Unlike the other versions, there are airborne nasties such as Shuriken-like spinning blades and clouds that occasionally darken and disgorge lightning. Timing is key to avoiding death, keeping an eye on the colour of passing clouds is a must to know when they’re about to strike and the blades need to be allowed for when using the trampolines to get airtime. There are also brightly coloured bonus balloons which, if grabbed as they float past, are worth a few extra points; there’s a rather sneaky stage where everything in the sky is red and even the pointy death stars can be collected.

I’ve already shown some C16 Kikstart love in the past by, amongst other things, disassembling the code and porting it to the C64 in 2007 and going back to it for this write up has reminded me why I put that effort into the conversion; the gameplay is enjoyable and offers a solid challenge by the later levels even if the collisions can be unfriendly at times – just have a look at the rather frustrating final death in the video whilst trying to jump onto what should have been a perfectly safe trampoline – but for a two quid game which is so entertaining to play I’m more than happy to overlook that.