Hyperzap 2018 (C64)

Before I start with the history – this is about Hyperzap in its myriad forms rather than just the new 2018 edition just released under the C64CD banner because why not – a quick disclaimer is probably required, my memory is shocking at the best of times and my recollection of dates may well be off by a considerable amount; usually I rely on friends who have a far better recollection of events, but in this particular case there’s nobody I can really ask. This is… frustrating to say the least and means I’ll be a little vague about specific dates, but I’ve tried to at least nail things down to the correct year and will update things should the facts turn out to be different.

I’ve mentioned Hyperzap in the past when talking about Co-Axis, it was the first “complete” assembly language game I ever wrote and started at some point in late 1986; the actual development process took several months because I was literally learning about the C64 as I went, working out features I wanted and then trying to understand the documentation to implement them. The code was written with the venerable Zeus 64 Assembler, the sprites drawn with an editor I was given but can’t remember the name of – the player ship is just a tweak I did of a default sprite included with it but the enemy was drawn from scratch by my friend Simon Probert – and the titles page is a Yak Society demo that was “repurposed” because I had no idea at the time how to rip the music myself.

There was also a Hyperzap 2 which improved on the original a little – some bugs were sorted out, it had a custom character set and there were multicolour sprites this time with the enemies being my own interpretation of the “licker ships” from Jeff Minter’s Iridis Alpha – but, during a coding session at a friend’s house on his C128, the source code was lost when the 1571 disk drive ate it – that was completely my fault and, although a valuable lesson about backing up regularly should have been learnt that day, it sadly wasn’t and came back to bite me on the posterior when working on Co-Axis,

And then there was another incomplete but at least partially preserved attempt to resurrect the original design, done for the sheer hell of it in the early 1990s around the time coding for what would eventually become Warflame was started; it was called Hyperzap ’91 and was essentially a from scratch re-write of the original even down to the hardware-based collisions – Warflame in its original form uses the hardware registers as well – which also added simple Pirates In Hyperspace style movement patterns since that game, along with Kernal’s Chaos, Galax-I-Birds and a few others, was originally an inspiration for Hyperzap.

Fast forward over thirty years from the original to an annoyingly warm bank holiday weekend and yours truly was pondering the mysteries of the universe, the meaning of life and C64 hardware-based sprite collisions. We’ll just have a quick primer for anyone who hasn’t dealt with the collision registers in the past; sprite to sprite and sprite to background collisions are handled by a video register each which both use the bits in their byte to represent the eight sprites. Bits are are set when a collision occurs and, whilst that’s fine for background collisions bar a few caveats, it doesn’t tell the entire story for sprite to sprite impacts. For example, if the lower four bits of the register are set there’s no way to tell from that if there are two separate collisions (and which pair sprites are involved) or if all four are clustered together somewhere.

So what Hyperzap 2018 does is split things in two. It checks the sprite to sprite collisions to see if the player is in trouble and, because the bullet is a software sprite, background collisions can be used to check when nasties have been shot. False positives don’t occur with the starfield because one of the multicolours doesn’t actually trigger sprite to background collisions and the registers are cleared at the top of the frame and checked just before the status bar so that doesn’t accidentally “shoot” enemies either. Being a software sprite also means the bullet can be coloured independently to the hardware sprites and the spaceship uses a second sprite as an overlay so it doesn’t share dark grey with the enemies.

I’ve also added a simpler version of the enemy movement patterns from Pirates In Hyperspace where only the vertical speeds are changed and two enemies will update every five and a bit seconds. It is almost painfully simple stuff for sure, there aren’t many bells or whistles past having a titles page and there’s a fairly obvious fault in the game design which survives almost completely intact from the 1987 original but, considering the bulk of the code took around four hours, I’m quite pleased with the results and it was nice to finally use that Marc Francois tune in something too. The source code is available through good old Github for anyone wanting a prod around and a download is over at the CSDb.

Playing Alloyrun (C64)

The C64 has been blessed with a huge number of decent scrolling shoot ’em ups over the decades , but one of note which was completed but not actually released Alloyrun by Ash & Dave who were also behind Mission Monday. There’s a far more in-depth account of why this game wasn’t released at Games That Weren’t, but the short version is that the intended publisher ran into financial difficulties before going under without a release happening. That’s something of a shame because the game itself is pretty solid with some nice if somewhat unusual parallax background scrolling, two simultaneous players flying craft that look suspiciously like the Silver-Hawk and some fantastic title and high score tunes from the Maniacs Of Noise.

There are two parts to each level, the first has scrolling backgrounds which must be avoided – easier said than done especially since there are a few “cheap” spots where a dead end doesn’t reveal itself until there’s no way out – which are inhabited by waves of swirling enemies and, once the end of the map has been reached, the action moves into deep space for more enemy waves before culminating in a boss fight which, rather unusually for this kind of game, can actually be avoided by dodging around the large craft as it crawls menacingly across the screen.

When certain enemies are downed they leave behind spheres which contain weaponry power-ups, the colours denote which option is available for collection and the game helpfully displays the weapon name on the status bar as well, although picking the item up can be tricky since they continue to follow the attack wave’s movement pattern. Trying to keep hold of the bouncing laser is sensible since it fires a couple of angled beams which rebound off the top and bottom boundaries of the playfield and pass over the landscape; these make dealing with hard to reach enemies easier – especially when paired with the front laser even if that stops at the walls – and can be used on the boss’s shields from above or below without being in the line of fire. Care needs to be taken even when fully armed though, because, although it doesn’t just leave the player with the default pea shooter, losing a life also powers down the weapons.

I’ve enjoyed playing Alloyrun ever since I received the Legend crack which was doing the rounds – since the game was never commercially released that’s pretty much how anybody would have got it – and, whilst not quite up there with C64 classics like Armalyte, Io or Enforcer, it still plays well. My only real complaints would be the one mentioned above – those unfair dead ends which have stolen my precious bouncing laser so many times over the decades – and the slightly lacklustre bosses, but they’re not deal breaking issues so I still go back to this one regularly.

Playing Warhawk (C64)

I’ve been playing Warhawk quite a bit recently whilst testing various recording settings for YouTube, so it’d be churlish of me to not actually talk about the game itself! And it’s another budget shooter that I’ve got some nostalgia for, including a few shockingly vague memories of being at what I believe was a PCW show in London and seeing it running for the first time on Firebird’s stand; trying to play a fast-paced game in the middle of a raucous exhibition hall was never going to work and my arse was duly handed to me, but I was sold and picked up a copy as soon as my local software emporium had it in stock.

The obvious influence is Tehkan’s 1984 classic coin-op Star Force to the point where a couple of escaped preview versions exist (included in the Gamebase 64 archive, one under the development title of Proteus) which have similar end of level guardians; these disappeared for the actual release to be replaced by a final screen on each stage where the player is pelted with enemies which home in on them. Actually, here’s a handy hint for that part of the game whilst I’m here; park the ship over the second digit of the score from the left, hold completely still and just hammer the fire button – you’ll take a few hits doing this depending on how fast the enemies are moving, but it’s safer than trying to dodge, weave and blast.

The pace increases with each stage of the ten included and some of the enemies get more vicious in the process, but there are gaps in the madness since a new wave can’t start until the bullets for the previous one have left the playfield and players can “herd” enemy bullets to maximise that quiet time with a little practice. Because it gets so manic this isn’t a “one hit kills” kind of shooter and there is what at least initially appears to be a generous energy gauge which decreases a little with each hit. There’s also a power-up that starts appearing at level 4 which speeds the ship up a bit, gives it a faster firing rate and removes the need to constantly stab at the fire button, but this enhancement is only temporary and care must be taken to avoid shooting the items.

Warhawk‘s sprites are very nice – the titular craft in particular really looks the part – but, whilst the background graphics are reasonable, they did look somewhat dated even when the game was released in 1986. The Rob Hubbard soundtrack, on the other hand, still holds it’s own well is is certainly worth several listens; that’s best done on the titles page, it gets “remixed” during play since the lead channel constantly drops out to make room for firing and explosion sound effects. It might be an unintentional effect but having just the bassline driving away behind the frantic action works well especially when things really heat up.

Firebird published some very solid budget shooters for the C64 – and a few howlers like Force One, more on that another time perhaps – and this is a great example that starts off sedately but builts to a crescendo by the time the tenth level is conquered to the point where going back to start a new game almost feels like you’re playing in slow motion. And for those players who manage to loop Warhawk there’s always the challenge of playing for score to keep them going, the remaining shield is translated into points at the end of eac h stage and destroying all of the bases will earn an extra bonus.