Watching Backlog (C64)

Since I’m in an intro-y kind of mood right now I decided to have a ponder about “past glories” and loaded Backlog, a collection of intros I wrote for various people during the 1990s that were thrown together into a single file at the end of 1999. Perhaps unsurprisingly the show starts with an intro, although this one was written specifically for the job; it has a logo by WHW Design, music from 4-Mat – one of his earliest tunes as a member of the group if memory serves – and the design was based on a Cosine intro Hookie used during the 1980s.

The first actual intro in the collection was written in 1991 for Chancer when he was a member of Babygang and is one of two I coded for them. It saw a fair amount of use in part because it was designed to be compact, with everything bar the music being crammed into the first 4K of memory and there are even a few cases of this in the wild where the music was removed entirely in order to save even more space. I’m told that it also compresses rather well, although that’s more by luck than design on my part!

The Derbyshire Ram intro that comes next in the collection hails from 1992 and is pretty simple stuff with a swinging logo, scroller and some cosine-following sprites but, because I’m thoroughly disorganised and it took a little too long to code, so Barry had already left Deadline by the time everything was finished! And there’s a similar story behind the Success intro that follows as well, it was commissioned by Mistri in 1993 and I spent some time cramming the logo and larger character set into a ridiculously small amount of space only to find out that they’d just joined forces with The Ruling Company and my code would therefore remain unused.

Next is the only other Cosine intro included in this collection, which was first used for the Electronic Music System V7.03 in 1997 and subsequently linked to a couple of Cosine games around the same time. The main “design choice” was to work within a reduced area of the screen by drawing a box around everything apart from the logo and this is the primary inspiration for Refix 2017. The final intro in the collection was coded in around five hours to go in front of A Lil Bit Of, a three part demo by Carcass again put out in 1997. The music in the final release was composed by Necrophobic, but I didn’t realise there was a new tune being supplied so the intro is timed around the Replay tune included on this release. Once space has been pressed we get to the finale, another 4-Mat tune accompanying a large “end” logo that swings onto the screen.

There are a couple more intros that could have been included including the second Babygang intro mentioned earlier – there’s an extremely good chance that I actually forgot about it when compiling the collection – and one I did but, if memory serves, never quite finished for Rebel Alliance around the time I was coding Pink Elephants In Lemonade. And because of those two the idea for Backlog 2 has been stewing pretty much since the first one was released although, unless I’m forgetting something else, there’s not much to go into it after those and the more recent Cosine intro used for GR9 Strike Force

Workprint – November 2018

So my plans for releasing last weekend went… well, badly. Ongoing illness and me never being at my best this time of year aside, the main reason is that my ability to plan ahead is at best negligible and what little “skill” is actually there will often be completely overpowered by industrial quantities of procrastination. Plan A was started but was too ambitious so ran out of steam and the switch to a more realistic Plan B simply arrived too late in the day to be viable. It’s probably telling that my last contribution to X was For Teh Win in 2006 – back when I was more able to pull all-nighters if needed – where the actual workload was smaller since it ran from a single file and I didn’t do the graphics…

It’s not that I didn’t get anything done though because some code was written and indeed linked, so what I’m “planning” to do now is consolidate Plan B and another project that’s been on the back burner for ages into one, easily manageable demo with the intention being to push the results out of the door in time for the C64 competition at Forever next year since there’ll be a joke in there which should hopefully work with that audience… because if you can’t be top of the pops for technical expertise and haven’t really got the conviction to carry off something thematic, try going for the laugh.

Anyone who hasn’t looked at the releases from X’2018 should give them a go, there were twenty one demos and six 4K intros in total (as well as a couple more demos released outside the competitions and a metric bucketload of music and graphics entries) with even the just-for-fun entries like the one from Poo-Brain – only the second C64 release from the newly-minted C64 division of a usually Windows-based group – being enjoyable to watch.

As an unexpected but happy Wednesday morning addendum, I’ve just noticed that the CSDb Intro Creation Competition is back for 2018 as of Monday. The closing date is on the 6th of January 2019 so that’s a solid two months of coding time and participants can enter up to three intros. I’ve thrown my hat into the ring for a couple of previous instances so it’s the well that Macro Sleep, Refix 2017 and Koalatro sprang from as well as C64CD release Clonetro. I think there’s a few existing ideas knocking around amongst my workfiles so, once things are back on a more even keel, I’ll have to start dusting them down to see where I stand.

Watching Starion Intro Remake (C64)

Since it’s the weekend of X’2018, I wanted to take a quick look at something from a previous instalment of that now venerable demo party; Starion Intro Remake by Booze Design is, in a plot twist that should come as a surprise to absolutely nobody, a reworking of a Starion intro. The original, which most people seem to remember from Starion’s scrolltext editor – a remarkably useful tool back in ye olde days when we used the painfully clunky approach of typing our scrollers onto the power-up screen before transferring them into memory with a monkitor – was released in the 1980s and features a nicely drawn green logo which swings back and forth whilst being expertly spread out over some raster bars by an FLD routine – it looks suspiciously like this:

Zooming forwards about thirteen years to 2001 and one of the entries into the wild competition at X that year was a remix of the very same intro, this time from HCL of Booze. His version takes the original logo and Laxity’s wonderful music but starts completely from scratch with the code; the FLD has been replaced with something much finer – instead of stretching the character lines apart it can now work on every pixel line – and everything can move through the side borders including the scrolling message and a solitary sprite which now bounces happily around the screen over the logo and raster bars.

The original is for my money at least a classic, not as well known or thought of as the most iconic intros from Triad or Fairlight but still a well executed piece of code with great audio and visuals, so seeing that revamped into the borders and going completely mad with the main effect was fantastic, especially since it begins by copying the movement of Starion’s original before starting to make the strips of logo finer with each pass. It came second in the competition to Padua’s Trilight – another intro remake, this time revamping both of the aforementioned Triad and Fairlight intros and evolving those changes as part of an ongoing narrative – but, whilst that’s a funny demo and has some very solid coding, the Starion Intro Remake has always been the one I go back to from that competition for the logo movement and Laxity’s music.

Here’s a terrible thought though; this remake is now seventeen years old so the distance between its release at X’2001 and now is actually bigger than the gap between it and the original code that it was based on… and if that has you feeling a little old, said original intro turned thirty this year!