Watching Little Demos (Atari ST)

“Robb says wow!” We’re going back to the early releases of Atari ST legends The Exceptions for a quick squint at the two demos which followed on and indeed evolved from Readme.prg – this would all lead to The B.I.G. Demo in early 1988 but that’s probably a post for another time (along with quite a bit of recording since the name isn’t exactly ironic).

The first of these two releases is Little Sound Demo and the large scrolling message with palette rotation in the background returns for another outing, but this time the picture has some raster bars through the TEX logo instead of the background and some decorative palette rotation around the indicator saying which piece of music is currently playing. There are twelve tunes in total which are mostly conversions of Rob Hubbard’s work from the C64 – hence the picture of a Breadbin getting lamped in the back of its “head” by the music emitting from an ST – with a couple of pieces composed by new group member Mad Max who also did the conversions and wrote the music driver.

That handle might not be familiar to those outside the Atari ST scene, but a few folks might recognise his real name Jochen Hippel since he was the musician for several games including Wings Of Death and the ST versions of Turrican and Turrican 2. He also released an album mostly consisting of reworked versions of his game tunes called Give It A Try and I’ve got a copy of that CD knocking around… somewhere?

Little Color Demo continues where its predecessor left off in expanding on what Readme.prg did and wedging more colour and action into the display like the barrel scroller between the two pictures of Rob Hubbard, more palette rotation under the tune list and some serious colour splitting on the lower scroller. One feature that wasn’t carried over from the previous release however is Mad Max’s compositions, there’s only eight tunes in this demo and everything is a Hubbard cover apart from the version of Axel F.

It’s fascinating to see the code mutate and evolve as the coders learnt more about their machine of choice but, whilst the bespoke music driver and converted tunes are a major plus, the hyperbole around them is probably pushing things a little; the tunes are good if sometimes missing elements – or large chunks in the case of Flash Gordon and International Karate – but the sounds being used don’t really hold a candle to their C64 equivalents. Rob himself was already doing Atari ST tunes in 1987 including a reworked version of Human Race tune 4 for Goldrunner, which was coded by the well-known game developer Steve Bak who, by a sad coincidence, passed away a couple of days ago whilst this post was being written.

Looking at these two as a whole, as with Readme.prg they were a little underwhelming to the teenage version of me waiting for the Atari ST to really offer stunning graphics and sound – hearing those covers of older Rob Hubbard tunes was cool but nowhere near enough to entice anyone away from the C64 in that respect – but the early works from Mad Max did offer some promise for the future and both demos are significant milestones in the Atari ST’s scene history.