Funky Stars (C64) released

Just a quick post to talk about Funky Stars, a new release for t’other label from new member aNdy; the name comes from the stars behind the logo and a lovely cover of Quazar/Sanxion’s Impulse Tracker tune. This is also an entry into the CSDb Intro Creation Competition for the 16K category, which is always a Good Thing in my book.

It was something of a surprise to hear that somebody else actually wanted to be a member of C64CD and I had to tweak the CSDb entry accordingly whilst pushing this out… so I wonder if there’s anyone else out there?

Here Goes (C64) released

So here we go with Here Goes, my first entry into the Intro Creation Competition for 2019 and, as promised yesterday, it’s for the 4K category; despite the limited memory footprint it’s still got 200 scanlines worth of raster colours, the logo and scrolling message required for all entries and a piece of music from Sack; the latter is a SID cover of the Amiga module Freeman which comes in at under 950 bytes long when Goattracker has finished weaving it’s magic!

The memory footprint for this one is a close to the wire $0400 to $13ff and a smattering of zero page use, with the screen data being decompressed directly to $0400 before the code starts up to save having to keep a second copy somewhere else beforehand. The source code can be grabbed from GitHub for anybody who might enjoy prodding around my slightly spaghetti-like code…

Gamerz Xtreme Intro 2 (C64) released

The original Gamerz Xtreme Intro was written in 2016 for the Twitch channel of the same name and, after a request on Twitter a couple of months back from the channel’s owner and a little work from myself and aNdy, there’s now a second intro which hopefully turned up just in time for a planned channel refresh and transition to Mixer. This new intro is the rather imaginatively titled Gamerz Xtreme Intro 2 and it has everything you could want from an intro; lots of moving raster bars, bouncing multicolour bitmap logos with wave effects, a sideborder ROL scroller and some great music.

As with the previous intro, this was provided to Psycho Stick in source code form including the relevant tools to build it and a configuration file. The latter is basically an assembler include containing all of the bits which can be edited to change the scrolling message text and tweak it’s colours or select one of the pre-made raster effects for the main part of the screen. Once that file has been modified and saved, a supplied batch file can be triggered which assembles the code and crunches it down ready for use.

Getting this done was a lot of fun and one piece of “overkill coding” only becomes visible when the “debug borders” option is enabled in VICE, all of the colour splits in the main effect area are lined up to the same cycle for the entire height of the screen… that took far too much effort to get right, especially considering it’s completely hidden from view and nobody would’ve even noticed either way had I not drawn attention to them!